Monthly Archives: July 2014

From PhD to Industry

A few weeks ago I ran into a former student who had recently completed a PhD in a biology discipline and now works in technical sales. He’s a bright, outgoing, ‘emotionally intelligent’ sort of bloke. He did his PhD in … Continue reading

Posted in education, Research | 2 Comments

3rd level research: He who pays the piper calls the tune?

Guest Post by Joe MacDonagh, School of Business and Humanities ITT Greg is taking a well-earned break from this blog and his DCU research and lecturing duties. I’m guest writing on the hanging question in his last post: why should the … Continue reading

Posted in education, Research | 1 Comment

Why should the state fund academic research?

Many academics would scoff at the very idea of asking this question. To them, it is so self-evidently obvious that  research should be funded by the taxpayer that they view the question as preposterous. In these recessionary times, the prevailing … Continue reading

Posted in education, Research | 1 Comment

Signalling and the Structured PhD

‘Signalling’ is the idea that the value of third level education is not just that it provides students with knowledge and skills that are useful in the workplace but that it acts as a sort of marker for certain innate … Continue reading

Posted in education | 3 Comments

Recommended books about education and related matters

Here’s a list of some books about education and related subjects that have influenced my writings in this blog. All are worth a read in my view. If not quite contrarian, most of these books challenge the consensus in some … Continue reading

Posted in education | 2 Comments